A Montessori Nursery

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From my own research into Montessori infant environments I believe the single most important underlying principle of them is freedom. Freedom to move about. Freedom to explore. Freedom to select toys and materials. There is also a very clean aesthetic and a focus on ownership. The room belongs to the child, not the parent. Which means shelves are low, pictures are hung at child height and furniture (with a few good exceptions) are child-sized.

But, if you are anything like me you need a bit more than abstract principles and a few pictures gleaned from Pinterest to go on for creating an environment. Especially when you are a brand new parent or in the last months of pregnancy. When I decided to go with a Montessori style nursery for our daughter I began looking around for a mix of principles, ideas, and pictures. If you are fortunate enough, you can even attend classes and talk with teachers at your local Montessori school. That was not the case for us, so it was all by the seat of our pants!

I didn’t figure out the Montessori mobiles or what infant materials Montessori created in time to really use them with Cam, but I have since come across this information.¬†For anyone else struggling I’m using this Monday to aggregate some resources I have found for creating infant (first year of life) environments. I hope someone else finds them helpful.

  • Some thoughts on creating an infant environment from North American Montessori Center. This has the Montessori mobile sequence.
  • Here’s a link to a tutorial for a cloth puzzle ball. She also has tutorials for making each of the mobiles.
  • For the very young infant grasping toys are a great thing. Montessori mentions a small silver rattle to begin with, but you can also try these wooden toys or these grasping rings. I have also knit small, medium and large balls for a number of my friends and my daughter. I even put rattles in a few of them just to give them an added element. (The links I’ve added are to places you can buy the toys from, but I have not personally ordered from any of these companies or people so I can’t speak to their service and quality.)
  • Once the child is older, these are the “official” infant toys designed by Montessori, but if you take the ideas behind them (dropping a ball through a hole, threading a ring on a dowel) I think you can find other, less expensive toys that may serve the child longer. (See pages one and two, the rest of the puzzles and the like are not exactly Montessori.)
  • For pictures of some well done Montessori nurseries see my Pinterest board: Montessori Spaces
  • I also would like to note that if you have an IKEA nearby, they are a great resource for inexpensive and flexible furniture. We have A LOT of IKEA furniture and with the exception of the birds tearing it up, we haven’t had any problems with quality.

I will conclude by saying we didn’t go for a full-blown Montessori nursery. We were just a little too late to the game and our house wasn’t (and isn’t) fully¬†remodeled. That made storage tight in the nursery and in other rooms. We eliminated a fair amount of storage, come to think of it. We also took an eye to the future and put in more shelving (such as a reading bench) so the space can grow with Cam. I am always an advocate of striking the right balance of principles and your own lifestyle. So use the resources to help you find what aspects work best for you.

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