Diversity Swap: Wild Berries by Julie Flett

Starting this fall I am going to be regularly posting primarily on books. This is the start of one of three book series I am going to be running that gives you diverse book selections to try in lieu or in tandem with classics. While I am passionate about getting diverse books, which are often new books, into kid’s hands I am not advocating that we remove the classics from their hands before placing the diverse ones there. This series is intended to give you more books, not fewer to read. For similar recommendations be sure to check out We Need Diverse Books Summer Reading Series. They are doing the same thing, but feature a wide age range for their books. Book posts will appear (usually) on Fridays. 

This first book I am presenting is pretty close to the classic, but many of them won’t be exactly analogous. Most of us know Little Sal and her mother from Robert McCloskey’s Blueberries for Sal. If you are unfamiliar, go check it out. The art is lovely and the story is both funny and nostalgic. This classic has been around for ages, and with good reason. Children and parents alike love the story. 

Blueberries for SalFor another book about a grandmother and child going out to pick blueberries and enjoy nature, try Julie Flett’s Wild Berries. Both stories take place in similar locations. Flett’s book will work well for younger audiences as well as older ones (Blueberries for Sal is rather long, although engaging). I think this book, like Sal is very timeless. In Sal, it’s clear it’s the 40s or 50s, but really there is no reason this exact story couldn’t be happening today. The same is true in BerriesWild Berries also features the Cree dialect which can open up discussions about the number and variety of Native Nations that live across the US.  

Wild Berries

Flett’s art is incredibly beautiful, be sure to check out her other books (I particularly like We All Count, a counting book in Cree and English).

 

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