Decolonize Your Bookshelf: City Shapes by Diana Murray

Decolonize Your BookshelfCity ShapesCity Shapes written by Diana Murray, illustrated by Bryan Collier

From Goodreads: From shimmering skyscrapers to fluttering kites to twinkling stars high in the sky, everyday scenes become extraordinary as a young girl walks through her neighborhood noticing exciting new shapes at every turn. Far more than a simple concept book, City Shapes is an explosion of life. Diana Murray’s richly crafted yet playful verse encourages readers to discover shapes in the most surprising places, and Bryan Collier’s dynamic collages add even more layers to each scene in this ode to city living.

I know concept books can seem babyish, but this book is anything but. Maybe it’s the city setting that makes it feel more hip and sophisticated. The shapes the story presents are fairly basic, but there is a lot to look at on the pages and I think it can inspire your child to begin looking around them.

Murray has used rhymed couplets to great effect here. They give the book some music and really keep you turning the pages. The shapes shared in the book are pretty basic, but I think how they are being used focuses more on visual literacy than learning the names of shapes. 

I don’t know how Collier does it, but he illustrates the most amazing people. They always seem to glow on the page and your eye is drawn right to them. If you want to have an art discussion with your child, point out that Colliers has used a collage style for these illustrations. Ask them how they think the collage style lends itself to this particular story. 

I’m going to be using this book in a storytime this fall in my library. As I said above, concept books (books about a concept like shapes or numbers or letters instead of a story with a plot or straight nonfiction) can seem aimed at babies, but my purpose in sharing this book with older children to is encourage them to begin looking around them. If they can find shapes in the world around them, they can break art down into its composite pieces and analyze it which is a skill I’m going to be working on with my preschoolers. Looking around is exactly what the little girl in City Shapes is doing. 

After reading this I highly recommend you take a walk with your child and see what shapes you can find in your own house or neighborhood. 

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