Monthly Archives: January 2018

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How #MeToo Is About Power, Not Just Sex. At Sacramento Country Day School

Or How Apologies Can Turn into Fertile Grounds for Perpetuating Misogyny. This happened at SACRAMENTO COUNTRY DAY SCHOOL. Update 6/26/2018: I’m naming names after hearing about some shit that’s going down there now. 

I think at this point we’re all aware of the #metoo movement of 2017, but what I haven’t seen discussed is how sexual harassment isn’t necessarily about sex but about sexism and most particularly about power and how women fit into power dynamics (or don’t as the case may be). I recently read this article by Katherine Cross and she points out that “…this moment points to larger, more systemic issues of men in power silencing and marginalizing those they dominate — whether or not they use sex to do so.”  I would highly recommend you go read it too as it really helps frame what I am going to be talking about with the incident I experienced. Thank you to the author, Katherine Cross, a woman who has far bigger issues than I in regards to gender, power, sexism, and trolls. I appreciate how it helped articulate feelings I had about my own particular incident. 

I have blogged over the past about an incident that happened with my daughter, a school, and ultimately me. I am well aware of the jeopardy this places my husband in, but I feel very strongly that the behavior I encountered needs to be named. If you read on, I address this concept further. I am not sure, at six months out, if this blog is being monitored for either damage control or simply control, or even morbid curiosity, but to be honest I am hoping it is. What happened was not okay and the underpinnings of sexism will continue to influence the culture in that place.

I was asked to remove the posts that discussed the incident from this blog and, if I would not, I needed to tone down my language. Either way they were ready to get their lawyer involved. What you need to know about this conversation is that it took place between a wealthy, white, cishet, male in a position of ultimate power and a middle-class, white, cishet, woman not in power. I suppose fortunately this was merely about my gender. I suppose. Let’s be very clear, though, this was about power and exerting that power over a woman. Cross’ article hits eerily close to home when she talks about some of her own run-ins with men. “None of this behavior was sexual…But these people abuse their power in the same way; certain white people and men try to control the narrative in public, while cribbing you in private, making sure you can’t say what happened there. The consequences will be yours to reap, after all. You’ll be unprofessional if you come forward. You’ll get sued.” 

The words “I’m sorry” and “I regret” were used a fair number of times, but only as a way to manipulate and bully me into taking the last post down. In fact they were almost an afterthought to trying to salvage the school’s reputation. If you use those words in that way, no matter how sincere you believe they are, no matter how many levels you think there can be to an apology (yes, I was told there were levels to this apology), they have zero value. Zero. Value. Any thinly veiled threat that comes after them negates it all. I understand that our experience made the school look bad. But let’s be very clear, I did not make the school look bad. The school made the school look bad through their actions not through any fault of mine. I merely shared it out of anger and frustration. Out of a complete lack of being heard by anyone that stood to recognize my daughter’s humanity and my own and atone for stripping us of it.

Apologies sound like this: I’m sorry. I screwed up and/or hurt you and someone dear to you. I recognize how I played into the issue (i.e. racism, sexism, ableism, homophobia, etc. or any combination of these). I will learn and do better. Period. You then go on and do better, do what you can to right the wrong, and, most importantly, do no more harm. Apologies are never qualified, otherwise you are simply victim blaming.

In asking me to self-censor with the threat of legal action if I didn’t, the school showed that they were and continue to be only concerned with their reputation and not at all interested in making things right, learning from their mistakes, or building and maintaining the human relationships that sustain a small business like that. They hid behind people unrelated to the incidents feeling offended by my language, because to them these people’s offense was more important than how my daughter and I had been treated by the school. I’ll say it again, even those people mattered more than me and my daughter. She and I have no humanity in their eyes. The woman who did the testing made sure to remove it. The school never restored it.

The post itself was found by another employee who claimed to be my friend and felt comfortable enough talking to me about abortion, but apparently didn’t feel like she could even mention this to me. Her first instinct was to report it to a man in power. There was a woman in power that she could have gone to, but she chose to jump over her and go straight to a man in power. You can be complicit in your own oppression. This person was another woman and often they are some of the most vehement, and yet unknowing, supporters of patriarchy and woman-bashing. Had that person reached out to me personally I may have been inclined to update or even rewrite the post. At this point it’s hard for me to say how I would have handled it. 

The phrase “you are emotional” was also used in this conversation. No matter if it was intended to or not, this tapped into a deep history of misogyny with those words. A history which has denigrated women and been used to take their power, undermine them, remove their humanity, and subjugate them. In worst cases, it has been used to institutionalize them at the whim of men. He wasn’t wrong, I am and was emotional. My daughter was terrorized, traumatized, and treated like garbage. I was was treated condescendingly, had my judgement as a parent called into question over something as personal as the choice to have one child and to stay home with that child, and then I was dismissed by the school for my concerns over our treatment. And yet, to use that phrase in that way was not intended to acknowledge my very valid emotion over the whole situation. It was a weapon to try to bully me into submission much like the “apology” given to me.

In addition, the fact the school was happy to apologize to my husband and merely regretted not reaching out to me was more evidence of the underlying misogyny in the whole situation. It was implied further that I should have come to the head earlier, as if it was my job to come looking for an apology for the insulting behavior we endured and the school’s inappropriate response. Furthermore, I was told that the language in that post made me look bad. This continued to tap into the desire to tone police women. If any language dares belie the underlying emotion a woman feels, it become dangerous and in tone policing me, and women generally, men seek to keep us in a place of submission and repression. It is used to put the person with privilege and power (in this case the man and the institution) back into control of the conversation by ignoring the message and focusing solely on the emotionality. Please go read this comic to understand tone policing and emotion as a silencing tactic. Whether or not he set out to tap into that institutional misogyny, he did, and that is how it works to maintains its power. It’s always lurking under the surface and intent does not matter. That is why I still feel, after all this time, it is important I put this out there.    

I refuse to allow myself to be devalued and, more importantly, dehumanized like that. I am extremely fortunate to be in a place of privilege that allowed me to protect myself and stand up for my humanity. Many people in worse situations don’t have that privilege. I recognize that. It is something I need to work towards fixing as a person with privilege. But I have inherent value as a person simply for being a person and it is sad to me that an institution that is educating our next generation cannot see that and does not practice it.

More generally this makes me sad that there is so much work to be done until the world is equitable for women. It’s the world I am now raising two girls in and if misogyny runs this deeply it’s going to be very difficult to root it out. Until then I need to stand up for myself and I need to teach my daughters to do that too. 

Blog Reboot

I know earlier last year I said I wasn’t going to be posting here very often, but I’ve changed my mind. There are a few reasons for this, the first of which is, I’ve missed it! I don’t write this blog for anyone but me and I love having the space to put my thoughts out there. If people (parents who want to homeschool or parents who like alternative educational philosophies) come across my blog and want to stick around or find a few things that are useful, then that’s fantastic. If no one but my best friend reads this (hi, Alexis! *waves*), then that’s fantastic too. But really, I enjoy writing this content. 

We “officially” started homeschooling this past Fall since my daughter reached the mandatory age for school entry. It’s been a bit rocky figuring out what she says she wants to do, what she is actually willing to do, and what I can sanely manage. So I want to write to encourage myself to try activities and methods out. I want to write about makerspaces and makerspace philosophy here as it fits well with unschooling. I want to write about books and some of the really specific reasons we have chosen to homeschool. 

I also decided that I want to share a lot more around promoting diverse books for parents. I still have my library blog where I review books, but I want to share more of what to do with books and promote diverse books to parents and homeschoolers. We’re going to be embarking on some set discussions around picture books this coming year and I want to talk about them for white parents who also want to start these conversations. To be clear, diverse books does not necessarily mean Issue Books With Big Themes, although I will be reading some of those with my white daughter to ensure she is getting an education grounded in identifying her privilege. Mostly I mean ensuring that the books I promote and read and suggest don’t feature all white people or, worse yet, racially coded animals, and tap into the self- and small-press publishing industries where we’re really seeing the gaps in representation addressed. 

I guess the other thing to share is that we decided to have another baby. We were surprised that we wanted another kid and are a little nervous having no experience with siblings ourselves (and having seen the mess of sibling relationships our parents have). The new baby is due in mid-March so I can’t be certain what my posting schedule will look like this year. I may very well be overwhelmed and find I only post once in a blue moon. Bear with me as I figure out this new adventure. 

To these ends here are the new series you will see coming across the blog with little descriptions of what they’ll be:

Friday Five: This theme is an old one I’m bringing back and will be using to promote diverse books. The post is just a booklist of five titles around a theme, nothing fancy, but we read around themes and it could be helpful for other homeschoolers, parents, or teachers. 

Story/Circle Time: You’ll find these in a slightly different format on my library blog, too, but here I’m tweaking them to fit well with circle time. If you need something to fill 20-30 minutes during the week this is something that might work.

Each storytime is centered around a theme and includes songs, finger plays, flannel boards, and wiggle time. They were piloted with preschool aged kids, but there isn’t any reason you couldn’t use them with Kindergarten- and first-grade aged kids. And it may be obvious, but don’t feel like you have to use them exactly as they are written. For example, if you don’t have a flannel board, feel free to use puppets or simply read the story. Each storytime is followed by a page of extras which give you either additional material if you have a longer block of time to fill or books and songs that can be swapped in if you need to improvise.

Chances are good you won’t own every book listed in these storytimes. Even I don’t and I have a very large collection. I would encourage you to tap your local public library. Even if your branch doesn’t have a title there is a good chance they can get it for you from another library branch or system (Interlibrary Loan for the win!). Don’t be afraid to ask your librarian.  

Parenting for Social Justice: One of the major reasons I want to homeschool is a lack of attention to and awareness of social justice in schools, especially in their curriculum. Everything from erasure of certain groups of people, to heteronormative values, to fear of ruffling feathers, to use of punitive punishment instead of restorative justice methods. In this series I will offer up ways you can bring social justice into your child’s education, whether you homeschool or not. It can be hard to know where to start and what to say to your kids even if you want to get involved with social justice. I struggle with that, but am learning and want to share ideas you can use as jumping off points either for reflection, education or action. Please be aware that I am new to this. I will make mistakes and I am learning. If you notice things aren’t right please email me and I will fix it and make a note of what has been changed and why.   

Book Club: takes a book and gives your before and after discussion questions as well as an activity or craft to go along with it

Personal Essay/Reflection:  I’ve done these before, but I want to keep them up. I have one thing I need to get off my chest in the New Year that is incredibly personal but also taps into a social justice issue. You’ll probably see that essay first. 

The Diverse Bookshelf: I read a lot of books to keep up on the children’s publishing industry (and I love picture books) so I’ll be reviewing a few of them here that I think are particularly worthwhile. This is another place you’ll see me promoting diverse books. 

Homeschool Update: While you will be seeing a number of things I am doing in our homeschooling this will be an occasional post that explicitly talks about things we’re doing that may have not been covered in the other posts or looks at them with more of an evaluative lens as opposed to a presentation lens. 

If something seems interesting to you, check back. Each series should be going up on the same day each month. (update 6/6/18: With a new baby at home this isn’t happening, it’s going to be as I have time and energy.) I am also going to use this as a sort of landing page for the series, too. If you click on the series title above it will take you to a search for that tag. Of course life will get in the way. I have a lot animals to care for and Cam. I also have another big project on the horizon that I can’t talk about just yet, but it’s going to start taking up some of my time. I’m looking forward to getting back into blogging and showing up here to share ideas.