Zero Waste: Going Down the Rabbit Hole

Zero Waste BannerWith all the time I’ve spent over the last four months nursing a baby, I’ve gotten really into Instagram. I used to follow a lot of social media on my computer, but it’s just too hard to maneuver a laptop while sitting on the sofa and cradling a baby. So while trapped under her for an hour while she was tiny and nursing for long periods of time and frequently I got really into scrolling through Instagram. While cruising around on there I’ve come across the zero waste movement and I kind of went down the rabbit hole with it. I started following a variety of people, researching products, and reevaluating various aspects of our lives.

The underlying principles of environmentalism, environmental justice, and minimalism are not new to me. They’re ideas that I’ve been thinking about and exploring for awhile, but zero waste (which is kind of a misnomer) really gave me a tangible way to live those principles. I’m hoping to use this series on the blog to talk about how I have started to put those ideas into practice and how it’s getting incorporated into our unschooling journey as well. 

The zero waste movement isn’t without it’s issues, though. For starters no one is perfect and it’s hard not to produce any trash. Our economy is not set up for that to be easy. And for now that’s fine, I’m discovering. Some people prefer the term low impact over zero waste because it sets a more realistic expectation.

More troubling to me is how the movement is problematic in terms of social justice. For starters, the idea of zero waste is not something that hipsters started. It’s something that indigenous cultures around the world have practiced for eons, but capitalist, primarily Western companies, have co-opted the idea to sell products. Sure, they’re green, eco-friendly products but they’re products benefiting the company and their founders. Also, it’s hard to hold the expectation that all people can and should be zero waste. Not every one has access to the kinds of stores that allow them to reduce their waste. Many products that are low impact are expensive. Other ideas within zero waste, such as making your own foods, household cleaners, etc. require time and effort not all people can take on. 

All of this is information I’m beginning to research and sift through. I do really like the idea of zero waste and know we can do our part to reduce our impact as a family without having the expectation that everyone will be able to do everything we are. I’ll be sharing here to offer inspiration to others who might want to take the plunge. 

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