Friday Five: The Tooth Fairy

Over the past six months Cam has lost six teeth. Six! All right in front which makes eating pretty difficult. We don’t actually believe in the tooth fairy here, but Cam likes to read about her and pretend we believe. Here are five books about tooth fairies of varying stripes, although be aware none of them are overly pink and sparkly.

Anna and the Tooth FairyAnna and the Tooth Fairy written by Maureen Wright, illustrated by Anna Chernyshova

This one is funny. Anna has a loose tooth and a newish little sister. As she tries to draw a picture of the tooth fairy she realizes the tooth fairy and her baby sister have a lot in common (they both stay up all night, they have wands- or rattles, they have pink and frilly outfits). This can only mean one thing, her baby sister must be a tooth fairy in training. Anna decides she has to keep her tooth in so her sister won’t have to leave to become a real tooth fairy, but in the process of keeping her tooth in she discovers how fun it is to play with the baby which makes the idea of parting so much worse. Fortunately her mom helps set Anna straight, or does she? Part book about loose teeth, part book about siblings/new baby this one is definitely worth checking out. 

Tallulah

 

Tallulah the Tooth Fairy CEO written by Dr. Tamara Pizolli, illustrated by Federico Fabiani 

I have plugged this one before both here on my parenting blog and on my library blog. If you haven’t checked it out yet, what are you waiting for?! Tallulah runs a tooth fairy industry and she is ultra cool. She’s also black, something I have yet to see elsewhere in tooth fairy books. The illustrations are to die for if you love clean and modern design and the story is quite amusing. I’ve seen a fair number of tooth fairy books that allow there to be more than one fairy that goes around and Tallulah trains fairies as part of her dental empire. 

Tooth Fairy Cat

 

Here Comes the Tooth Fairy Cat written by Deborah Underwood, illustrated by Claudia Rueda

I haven’t read any of the other books featuring this cat, but I know he is beloved. I found the story to be very funny as the cat tries to prank the Tooth Fairy and ends up getting pranked himself. It’s the perfect story for the little tricksters loosing teeth in your life. It might also help you discourage any tricks your kids might have up their sleeve to catch the Tooth Fairy in action…or not. It’s also a good title for the animal lovers in your house. I know Cam prefers stories with animals over people (and I did too as a kid), so it might appease those kids who would otherwise not be too interested in reading Tooth Fairy books. 

The Untold Story of the Tooth FairyThe Untold Story of the Tooth Fairy written by Jose Carlos Andres, illustrated by Betania Zacarias

This book is particularly interesting for how it weaves together several myths around the Tooth Fairy and an undersea world. Lady Oyster has lost her pearl and she is very distressed. To help her out a series of sea and then land creatures go in search of the pearl. A mouse finds a tooth and decides that should do as a replacement for the pearl and passes it along down the chain of animals until it reaches Lady Oyster who is overjoyed with the find. The story has the opportunity to make up voices for all the different characters and also has a some interesting repetition and cumulative narration that make is especially engaging and a prime read aloud candidate. The book was originally published in Spanish.

I Lost My Tooth in Africa

 

I Lost My Tooth in Africa written by Penda Diakite, illustrated by Baba Wague Diakite

Another interesting take on what to do with a lost tooth. This story is based on what actually happened to Penda Diakite’s sister when they went back to Mali to visit family. Amina’s tooth is loose when they set out on their long trip to their home in Mali. Her father tells her if it falls out there she can place it under a gourd and she will get her very own chicken. This piques her interest and Amina wiggles and wiggle the tooth trying to get it to come out. When it does fall out she gets not one, but two chickens- a hen and a rooster. She diligently cares for them and the eggs they lay. But will they be in Bamako long enough to see the chicks hatch? An end note from the author and illustrator, a daughter-father team, reveals the story and culture it represents. There is also an adorable photograph of the real Amina holding her chicken and proudly showing off the hole where her tooth was. Chickens and loose teeth, what’s not to love?

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