Monthly Archives: October 2018

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Storytime: Apples and Pumpkins

Theme Storytime Banner

Storytime is a series that you can use to get your homeschool day going. If you don’t open with a circle time (we don’t), keep it in your back pocket for one of those days when you need something to fill 20-30 minutes or when you want an enriching activity but don’t want to plan anything yourself. See this post for more detailed information about the series. 

Be sure to scroll all the way to the bottom, as a printable/downloadable pdf version of the storytime is available there. In the pdf there are extra books in case you don’t have access to the ones listed or need more, as well as extra songs and rhymes. 

Apples and Pumpkins

Opening Song

“If You’re Ready for a Story”

Sung to the tune “If You’re Happy and You Know It”

If you’re ready for a story, clap your hands.

If you’re ready for a story, clap your hands.

If you’re ready for a story, if you’re ready for a story,

If you’re ready for a story clap your hands.

(nod your head, sit so still)

Book

The Mystery Vine written and illustrated by Cathryn Falwell

 

Flannel Board

“Five Little Owls”

Five little owls on a moonlit night

Five little owls are quite a sight.

Five little owls Are you keeping score? One flew away! And then there were Four. Four little owls happy as can be,

One flew away then there were Three. Three little owls calling Who, Who

One flew away and that left two.

Two little owls having lots of fun.

One flew away and that left One.

One little owl we are almost done

He flew away and that leaves none.

 

Book

Apple Days: A Rosh Hashanah Story written and illustrated by Allison Soffer, illustrated by Bob McMahon

 

Wiggle Break

“Bananas Unite!”

Bananas unite! (Bring arms and hands together over your head)

Peel bananas, peel, peel bananas.

Peel bananas, peel, peel bananas. (Spiral hands and arms downward as if peeling)

Eat bananas, eat, eat bananas.

Eat bananas, eat, eat bananas. (Pretend to eat a banana)

Go bananas, go, go, bananas.

Go bananas, go, go, bananas. (Wave arms over head and dance around)

 

Book

Wonderfall written and illustrated by Michael Hall

 

Goodbye Song

Teach the signs for “good bye” (waving right hand goodbye by folding fingers up and down) and “friends” (touch tips of pointer fingers together). Sing through twice.

“Good Bye Friends”

Sung to the tune “Goodnight, Ladies” 

Good bye, friends.

Good bye, friends.

Good bye, friends.

It’s time to say goodbye.

Click here to download the Apples and Pumpkins Storytime

Montessori Infant: Seven Months

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I missed six months. It’s been busy, in large part because Malin is now crawling and has been for nearly four weeks. She also pulls herself up to standing. We’re doomed. So while I’ve been following along with the Montessori materials, she’s jumped through a few of them because she sat up, started crawling and began pulling herself up so quickly.

We’re now at the fun part where I can assemble little treasure baskets for her with three or four items. She’s very quickly gaining control over her hands, passing objects between hands, manipulating them, turning them over, and banging them together. I remember really enjoying this stage with Cam and it was relatively easy to entertain her with a few new items rummaged from our kitchen or bathroom drawers.

Malin is really into blocks. Cam got into them, but not until much later. Malin likes to pull them out of the basket one by one, flip them around in her hands and look at every side, then set it down next to her and grab the next one. It’s interesting to watch and can entertain her for upwards of 15 minutes.

Ball Basket

I am always so amazed at what a different kid Malin is from Camille. While I knew she would be I had no idea we would be able to tell so early. Here’s to our last few months before she’s up and running.

Zero Waste: Backpack Kit

Zero Waste BannerAs I’ve been transitioning to a zero waste/low impact lifestyle I decided to kit out my backpack/baby bag with some zero waste essentials. Here’s a run down of what I keep in there.

  • dish towel- for drying hands, wrapping up food, I don’t alway have this on me
  • canvas tote bag- I have a ton of these at home that I’ve collected over the years, I take them with me separately to the grocery store, but sometimes I stop and don’t have the bags with me, this saves me from balancing items or from taking a bag
  • cloth diapers- we have some all-in-one diapers that I’m not wild about for using around the house, they function like disposable diapers in that they’re single use, so they’re perfect for out and about, wrap the wipes up inside them and tuck them into a wet bag, no need to worry about soaker pads or wet outers
  • food container- for leftovers or take out, ours flattens out which makes it easier to carry around when not in use
  • bamboo utensils- my husband and I each bought a set of these years ago to use for lunches at work, I have packed them in the backpack to use when we go places that only offer plastic ware or if we happen to need some flatware
  • reusable straws- again, for places that only offer plastic
  • coffee mug- I don’t always keep this in the backpack because with the diaper essentials and the weight of the cup it can get tight and heavy, but if we’re ever out and we need a cup for water or for coffee I like to have it, something lighter weight like those reusable Starbucks cups that cost $2-$3 would probably be totally fine

These are just some ideas for what you might want to carry with you to help reduce your waste while out and about. There are plenty of other zero wasters/low impact folks out there with additional or similar ideas. You might want to look for those to get some inspiration for other things you may want/need to carry with you. This is just a starting point. You may also want things that are more minimal or collapse down if you aren’t carrying around a large purse of backpack all the time.

Decolonize Your Bookshelf: Let’s Talk About Body Boundaries, Consent and Respect by Jayneen Sanders

Decolonize Your Bookshelf

I have a few thoughts I need to get out before I get into a review of this book. First is that colonization goes hand-in-hand with patriarchy, so despite the fact that this book isn’t really about incorporating more diversity into your shelves, it does relate very closely. The second is, what the fuck, with the confirmation of our newest Chief Justice bodily autonomy is apparently still up for debate (to be honest, I knew it was, but it still feels weird).

Lets Talk AboutLet’s Talk About Body Boundaries, Consent and Respect: Teach children about body ownership, respect, feelings, choices and recognizing bullying behaviors
written by Jayneen Sanders, illustrated by Sarah Jennings

It’s never really too early to talk to your children about body boundaries. You should also be teaching your children the correct anatomical terms for body parts. So yes, that means teaching your two year old the words penis, vagina, and vulva. There is nothing inherently bad or embarrassing about these words. This will be easier or harder depending on how you were brought up thinking about these words and the actual parts. There is no shame in bringing your own baggage to these conversations. But for the safety of our children we need to move through that discomfort and teach them to not be ashamed of their bodies (body positivity) or their feelings (sex positivity). Children who are taught correct body parts and boundaries (appropriate touches vs. inappropriate touches) and taught to set boundaries without shame will be able to share when someone has crossed those boundaries and exactly how. They will also learn to develop healthy, happy relationships. 

Not only does this book open those conversations for parents who may feel uncomfortable with talking about these topics, but it gives parents who are confused about where to start a good jumping off point. Despite my rant above, body parts are not mentioned. It’s primarily hugging and kissing of a very innocuous kind. And there aren’t any scenes with creepy adults crossing lines. But the concepts covered here are vitally important for a lifetime of needing to define and hold boundaries.

We found the illustrations to be engaging and fun and the text, while it got a little long overall, was also engaging. Do be prepared to stop and talk about the concepts covered here. There are a lot of notes at the end that can help you ask good questions and give you plenty of food for thought for each page of the book. This is immensely helpful, even for parents who know what they want to talk about. High five to the illustrator for including a child in a wheelchair and showing that that child’s body boundary includes the chair.  

Remember patriarchy is about power and by teaching girls to please above all else, as well as neglecting to teach them about body boundaries, we set them up in that power structure that takes advantage of them. Teaching boys that they have a right to women and girls gives them permission to use the power patriarchy mistakenly gives them. That’s not to say when girls don’t speak up assault or harassment is their fault or for boys that by going along with all the implicit messages we send them removes their culpability. It’s not and it doesn’t. Smash that patriarchy by reading this book with your daughters and your sons. Teach them that consent is sexy and that consent should always be enthusiastic.  Teach them: their body, their choice. And then be sure to back that up when relatives want a hug or kiss and they don’t want to give it.

A big shout out to Aisha Ray of Raising Luminaries/Books for Littles for bringing this book to my attention with her amazing review that I came across on Facebook. If you don’t already follow her, go do that now and then give to her Patreon. She works hard and is such an incredible resource for parents fighting to bring about change in this world. 

Friday Five: Interactive Books

Friday Five Banner

Friday Five is a series that suggests five books around a theme. You can use them to jump off into a themed homeschool unit, guide your reading around an interest, or just as a ready-made set of books to read. 

Interactive Books

Interactive books are books that invite the reader(s) to touch them, shake them and become part of the story. 

Tap the Magic Tree1. Tap the Magic Tree written and illustrated by Christie Matheson

Tap the Magic Tree follows a tree through the four seasons. Children are invited to rub, touch, tap and blow to help the tree change through the seasons. This is a really great way to introduce the change of seasons to young children as they help bring them about. I particularly like all of Matheson’s books with their clean, bright illustrations. This would also be a great addition to a nature or tree study unit. The real message here being that the tree isn’t actually magical, but that it can certainly seem that way. 

Mix It Up2. Mix It Up! written and illustrated by Herve Tullet

Press Here, Tullet’s first title, is sometimes heralded as being the start of this genre, but I prefer the author’s second book Mix It Up! This one focuses on helping children understand color theory through tapping, rubbing, and smashing the book closed. 

Don't Push the Button3. Don’t Push the Button written and illustrated by Bill Cotter

A little purple monster has been charged with not pushing a tempting little red button. But what will happen if it does?! Hilarity ensues as he gives in to the temptation and then tries to fix the results by pushing the button again and again and again. This one makes for a great read aloud, even in a large group. Kids will get a kick out of pointing out what has happened with each push of the button.

 

Don't Wake Up the Tiger4. Don’t Wake Up the Tiger written and illustrated by Britta Teckentrup

Teckentrup is like catnip in our family. We love her stories and her illustrations. This one is no exception. Here a group of animals needs to get from one side of a sleeping tiger to the other. Readers help the animals across the page by blowing them across or helping settle the tiger back into a deep sleep. But with the final animal, a balloon pops. Uh-oh. What is tiger going to do?

This Book Just Ate My Dog5. This Book Just Ate My Dog! written by Richard Byrne

Bella is out for a walk with her dog when something unexpected happens. Bella makes it across the gutter of the book, but her dog does not. After her friend, an ambulance, and fire truck head into the gutter to find out what’s going on and don’t return, Bella has to take matters into her own hands. Except she slips into the gutter too! A page turn reveals a note thrown out by Bella that requests that the reader turn the book sideways and shake everyone and everything out. I have used this book in the library to draw attention to the physical aspects of books and use it to kick off a conversation about all the names of the parts of a book. But it’s also a good interactive book for storytime if you don’t want to be swarmed by children all wanting to tap here, swipe there, and push the button.