Tag Archives: Big Picture

Books, Books, and More Books

So, you may have noticed that I’ve really been posting mostly about books lately. There are several reasons for that, the biggest being that this past year I was officially working in a library and my world has been books. I read a lot. I read to see if books are right for our library. I read to see if I can use them in lessons. I read them to see if they need to weeded out of our collection. I read them for fun. I read them to see if Cam would like them. I read them to Cam. 

Please don’t get the impression that libraries and librarians are all about books. I am not actually paid to read books. I am paid to shelve them, process them, and teach kids that come to visit me in the library. A big part of that teaching has nothing to do with pleasure reading. Nothing. At. All. I do work hard to make sure my students like to read, can read, and come in to read for pleasure. While pleasure reading is incredibly important, I also realize that it isn’t for everyone. Just like baseball isn’t something everyone wants to do. However, reading for information, reading to learn, reading to inform is of the utmost importance. So is evaluating what you are reading. Evaluating it critically. Looking at something and deciding if you agree. Deciding if an article is well reasoned and makes sense. Looking at who wrote an article (or book, or whatever) and sussing out their motives and evaluating those. Basically I teach critical thinking. That is what a librarian, especially a school librarian, is really there for. That is why you don’t see me writing a lot about literacy activities to force your child into interacting more with a book. I do write a lot about why or how a book might work for a family or child. That is just how I think about books. 

One thing I have become incredibly passionate about, and I’ve said this before, is getting more diverse books onto our library shelves. Personal libraries and institutional ones. And that’s where this passion and this blog have begun to collide lately. In light of all the recent crappy events in the world I think it’s more important than ever that we get positive representations of diversity (i.e. non-white) into our children’s hands, minds, and hearts. Books are an excellent, non threatening way to do that.

I am still trying to find how I want to focus my attention here and honestly that is a constantly moving target. I still plan on sharing what’s going on on the family farm and the things I am doing with Cam, but right now I want a space where I can promote books, particularly good diverse ones, with parents. I have a library blog that you can check out which is nearly all reviews, but I focus there on talking about books and how they can work for a library collection and that is very different beast from the home environment. 

The single best things you can do to make your child love reading are:

  1. Read to them
  2. Don’t make it a chore: No reading logs, no timers, no page number requirements.
  3. Let them choose what they read to themselves and what you read to them. Yes, even if that means a book you hate like Captain Underpants.
  4. Don’t tie it with punishment or reward: Don’t withhold reading for not doing chores, don’t make it a punishment for not doing chores, and don’t make them interact with a book they don’t like. If they have to read something particular for school I highly recommend you read it out loud to them. And PLEASE talk to them about why they are not enjoying it. Boring is not a response. Show them how to be more specific and articulate in their criticism. Encourage them to share those thoughts with their teacher. And be honest about your opinon about the book. I tell Cam all the time if I don’t like books and why (usually because they are racist).
  5. Read to them some more
  6. Did I say, read to them? Yes? Well, do it again. 
  7. Make sure they see YOU reading for pleasure. I know MANY parents that proudly say they’ve read all of two books in a year (or fewer) and yet fight with their children to make them read 30 minutes a day. Take a look at your relationship with reading. Seeing you read is going to be a much more effective motivator. And if you don’t hold yourself to a high reading standard, why hold your kids to it? If you don’t value it enough to do it 30 minutes a day, why would they? This also applies to #3. Don’t make them read high brow literature when all you read are New York Times bestsellers. By and large those are not high literature. That’s fine! We all read books to escape and have fun. Much like we all enjoy a candy bar or bag of potato chips from time to time. Just know that kids and their reading habits can and will look like yours. Just like your eating habits. 
  8. Know that reading doesn’t just happen in chapter books. Picture books are reading. Comics are reading. Text messages are reading. You read all day everyday, you just don’t think about it. You read emails, tweets, articles online, Facebook. That’s all reading. Don’t hold your child to an impossible standard of only reading the most difficult nonfiction text they can. And make sure they know reading comes in a lot of forms and formats including audiobooks. Even if they aren’t your preferences, they might be for your child. 
  9. Make sure they are seeing other people in books as well as seeing themselves. This can be difficult, but keep looking. 
  10. And just for good measure, read to them. Even when they seem way too old. 

Summer of Science

100dayspledgeI recently came across this project called The 100 Day Project. It encourages you to do one thing for 100 days, with an emphasis on making or doing something. The project technically started back in April, but I just don’t have time to do this kind of thing every day during the school year and I feel like I had my plate full this spring. So instead I decided to start late (which they still encourage you to do) and use it to frame my summer. For this blog I will be doing #100daysofscience with Cam. It will be 100 days of a simple, easy, and fun science exploration each day. 

I have the first week planned out and I think I will try and center weeks around a theme or concept that way it doesn’t feel like a bunch of disjointed projects. It might also allow us to hit on something Cam is interested in and explore more deeply. 

I will be posting (hopefully!) a picture each day on Instagram. I kind of hate taking pictures daily and I also don’t really like having yet another social media platform to check in on, so we’ll see if I can manage. You can see my latest in the widget in the sidebar over there. ———> I haven’t quite decided how to balance Instagram and the blog, but I’m thinking of writing a weekly round-up post where I share the pictures and a brief explanation of what the experiment was (and how successful and popular it was) so anyone interested can recreate it. 

In addition to these posts I am going to try and have a Friday Five book post each week this summer. While I enjoy sharing about our urban farm, our parenting successes and failures, and food, I am most passionate about books and I want that to come through here more. I haven’t been all that enthused about blogging lately (see my previous comment about a full plate this spring), and I want to find that passion again, because I do love it when I do it. 

One last note, I am also going to be doing this with my library/book review blog so if you’re following me on Instagram you’ll be seeing those photos coming through too. That one will be #100daysofdiversebooks. Quite frankly you may wish to see those too. Many of them (most) will be picture books that I test out on Cam and am looking at with an eye toward adding them to my library’s collection so they’ll be relevant here as well. 

Here’s to one more week in school and summer on it’s way!

Reflection 2016:1

So we have officially decided to unschool Cam. I don’t know why I say officially, but we’ve really talked about it and come to terms with the fact that she will not be going to school in the fall (or for many falls to come).

In some ways this makes me sad. I love the succession of the seasons and because of my childhood going to school I feel like the school year is very intimately connected with that. It makes me feel like she won’t have that even though I know this is not true. In our family we do a lot that is connected in with the seasons. Gardening, chickens, bees to name a few. Plus our family traditions and celebrations focus on the seasons too. For my husband I know he is sad that Cam will not be a “lifer” at the school he went to. He had deep ties to the school (we both do, but his are deeper and more positive than mine). I’m sure he’s mourning the loss of that potential connection, one we thought for several years would happen. 

I think we both have needed to come to terms with the idea that Cam will have a happy childhood without having one that looks like ours. It’s a mind shift for sure. 

Now that we are going to unschool we’re actually talking to people about our decision. I am getting questions from people. Is she going to school in the fall? Oh, really? What exactly is unschooling? And that right there has been a hard answer for me to articulate. Basically nothing is going to change. We’re just going to let her be. She can play and imagine and choose what she’s ready to learn. Which brings me to her latest endeavor. She’s started to write letters. 

The other day I was working in a puzzle magazine and she was watching me out of the corner of her eye. After a few minutes she leaned over and asked if I would help her write some words. I showed her how to form the letters and told her which ones to write and she did it. And she’s been doing it since. Prior to this she had been doing scribbled lines to indicate text, but she made a comment that she no longer needed to write in “her way” (which, as a side note, made me sad to see that go, it was so sweet).

This is how unschooling works and works well. She has the interest, no forcing or cajoling from me. I’ve offered to teach her letters before, but she hasn’t been ready or interested. Now that she is, though, she’s off. Slowly she is learning the letters’ names and the sounds they make. I suspect if she keeps this up she’ll be reading in six months or so. I’m helping her when she asks for it instead of inserting myself and deciding she has reached an arbitrary date for learning something. It’s very exhilarating to see this happen, because I think until you see your child do it, it’s worrisome and hard to disconnect from everything you’ve been taught about school and the traditional model. 

So, yeah. I’m working on formulating an explanation of what it is we want to do with Cam, not because I’m confused, but because others are. And they are genuinely curious about what it is we mean.  

A Little Weekend Reading: We Should All Be Feminists

We Should All Be FeministsWe Should All Be Feminists by Chimamanda Ngozi Adiche

From Goodreads: What does “feminism” mean today? That is the question at the heart of We Should All Be Feminists, a personal, eloquently-argued essay—adapted from her much-viewed TEDx talk of the same name—by Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie. With humor and levity, here Adichie offers readers a unique definition of feminism for the twenty-first century—one rooted in inclusion and awareness. She shines a light not only on blatant discrimination, but also the more insidious, institutional behaviors that marginalize women around the world, in order to help readers of all walks of life better understand the often masked realities of sexual politics. Throughout, she draws extensively on her own experiences—in the U.S., in her native Nigeria, and abroad—offering an artfully nuanced explanation of why the gender divide is harmful for women and men, alike.

This should be required reading for all parents of girls (both parents) and, quite honestly, parents of boys too. Adiche is an incredible writer (and speaker, as this was originally a talk she gave), but more than that she makes such excellent points. Points we should all be well versed in to help raise strong daughters, respectful sons, and end as much of the gender inequality as we can. 

“Culture does not make people. People make culture. If it is true that the full humanity of women is not in our culture, then we can and must make it our culture.”  

For the homeschooling and unschooling parent I think she often speaks to some of our ideals and ideas. The fact that the traditional schooling system does not address many of our concerns and feels more like it perpetuates ignorances and half truths, as well as falls into perpetuating stereotypes and incorrect ideas seems to be here in many of her points even though she is not speaking to that at all. This applies, at least for me, to both cultural, racial, and gender ideas, but here she speaks most to the gender aspect. 

“What if, in raising children, we focus on ability instead of gender? What if we focus on interest instead of gender?”

That part about interest really spoke to me. She also says:

“What struck me–with her and with many other female American friends I have–is how invested they are in being ‘liked’. How they have been raised to believe that their being likable is very important and that this ‘likable’ trait is a specific thing…We spend too much time teaching girls to worry about what boys think of them. But the reverse is not the case. We don’t teach boys to care about being likable. We spend too much time telling girls that they cannot be angry or aggressive or tough, which is bad enough, but then we turn around and either praise or excuse men for the same reasons. All over the world, there are so many magazine articles and books telling women what to do, how to be and not to be, in order to attract or please men. There are far fewer guides for me about pleasing women.”

I really think a lot of this stereotyping and inequality pops up in traditional schooling. I’ve seen it in action and am probably guilty of it myself in the classroom and at home. I cringe to think that and try to be aware of it. Reading things like this help bring it to the forefront of my mind and the more it gets in there the less likely I am to do it.

This is a very approachable read. Not because she isn’t an adamant feminist, but because it’s short and so readable. Adiche, as I said before, is an incredible writer and that comes through here. She could have come off very dry, making this feel like a college lecture, but it isn’t. She weaves in her own anecdotes and experiences. 

Certainly I am not doing this short piece justice in my review. All I can say is go read it. It’s available in print format for a few dollars or two dollars on Kindle. 

 

Fire Safety

Life has been busy, but it was interrupted last week by a rather scary experience. The house behind ours burned down. We didn’t notice it was on fire until we heard the sirens, our power went out and there were 15 foot flames coming out of their roof. Everyone made it out safely, but we were very concerned for awhile that our shed or house could catch fire too. 

After the excitement had died down we realized we needed to look carefully at our fire safety and I thought I would share some of our ideas and plans here. 

Fire extinguishers: there is now one in each part of the house including the garage and shed. Fires can start in garages with cars and junk piled around it can feed the blaze. Having an extinguisher nearby may help. They are also incredibly important in the kitchen where a lot of other house fires start. NEVER put water on a grease fire, use an extinguisher if you have time. 

Escape route: we don’t have a big house so I don’t know how detailed we need to get. If we can, we’ll leave through a door. But every window has a screen that can be easily pushed out. If your screens are screwed on, get them replaced so they fit properly and aren’t attached if possible. If they are metal consider having them replaced with the plastic screening so it can easily rip in an emergency. Second stories need escape ladders in the rooms. 

Defensible space and tidiness: Keeping the sides of houses clear of debris and junk will help prevent a fire from spreading either from your house or to it. I know it’s hard to keep houses totally clean, especially yard debris, but it can make a difference. Also keeping rooms tidy and garages clean will help slow a fire’s spread. It won’t stop it, but it can keep it from having lots of fuel. Again a tough one, but looking at how jam-packed our neighbor’s house was I’m sure they were not very good housekeepers and that didn’t help. (I’m talking piles and stacks of things, not not picking up toys).

Smoke detectors: Probably the most terrifying part in retrospect was how quickly the entire house was engulfed in flames. It took about 15 minutes. If they hadn’t had smoke detectors and had been asleep, I’m not sure they would have gotten out. Seriously. Make sure you have smoke detectors and make sure the batteries are working. Don’t combine them with carbon monoxide detectors. Smoke rises so detectors should be on ceilings or up high. Carbon monoxide is heavy and sinks. These need to be near the floor or on it. If CO is high enough to reach your smoke detector or smoke is low enough to reach your CO detector, it’s too late. 

Spark arrester: If you use your fireplace be sure there is a spark arrester on the chimney. This will prevent sparks and ash from landing on your roof and igniting a fire or blowing over to your neighbor’s house and starting one. Having the chimney regularly cleaned can also reduce the chance of fire. 

If at all possible make sure your electrical wiring is up to code (I know that’s an expensive one) and be sure you aren’t doing anything like overloading circuits or plugging things in to tons of adaptors and extension cords or power strips. The fire at the neighbor’s was an electrical fire that started behind the TV. If you have time run outside and hit the breaker, but being careful to begin with can help. 

I think this is all timely information too because we’re coming up on the holidays when people put out candles, have fires in their fire places, and will be cooking a lot more. Never leave candles unattended or cooking (for more than a moment or two). Under the right conditions fires can spread rapidly. And if a fire does start, get out and call the fire department. Your stuff is not worth risking your life or your family’s lives for. 

Activity In the Hive: Baby Chicks

We are a family of pets, but not your usual ones. There are no cats or dogs here, nor will there be anytime soon. We have rabbits and a turtle, exotic birds and fish, and chickens and ducks. We originally got the chickens for fun and we haven’t been disappointed. They are ridiculous and most of us could watch them run around doing silly things for hours. Cam loves to chase them around the yard and pick them up. We are also pleased to get the most delicious eggs from them. We are not big egg eaters, but I haven’t had to buy eggs in a couple years and our neighbors and coworkers are always happy to receive a dozen fresh eggs.

About a week and a half ago we went to the feed store to get a new batch of chickens. This is the third time we’ve had baby chicks and I think there is something incredibly magical and special about having such new life in the house. It’s an incredible lesson for Cam in how fragile, delicate, and precarious life is. When we buy the chicks we buy several, both for company and because there is the distinct possibility that one or more will die. We have been lucky that this has not happened, but I think if it did (and even the discussion about the possibility) is a good experience for Cam. I know we have this innate desire to protect our children from all that is bad and scary and sad in the world, but I would rather Cam was exposed to some of that in a safe environment and that we show her how to cope well with it. The thing is, she lives in this world and she will experience these let downs and emotions and it’s important that she knows how to process those emotions and move through them without getting lost in them. I know the experience of a small chick dying while she is only three will not give her profound understanding of death or sadness, but it’s a step toward that understanding and a part of her long learning process. 

The baby chicks also grow incredibly fast and are surprisingly self-sufficient and capable even at a day old. It’s an amazing thing to see them get bigger so quickly and to marvel at how complex life is. It never ceases to amaze us that they just know how to be upon emerging from the egg and with no parental support. 

It doesn’t hurt that they are adorable either (click the image to see it larger):

New chicks

Series Reboot in 2015: The Diverse Bookshelf

Once again I’m shaking up my series where I share book titles on the blog. This year I am making a concerted effort to be reading, reviewing, and buying books that feature diversity. There was a big campaign last year called #weneeddiversebooks that really brought a lot of attention to the lack of diversity seen in children’s publishing. If you haven’t heard of this I highly recommend you visit their site and read their mission and about why they got started.

The long and the short of it is that children deserve both windows and mirrors when they read. They deserve to see themselves and see people who are different from them. Sadly this is not happening largely because publishers claim that people won’t buy those books. While the U.S. (and the world) is getting more and more diverse children’s publishing, already low on representation, is staying the same. Here is an infographic put together by the fabulous publisher Lee & Low who does champion diversity that hits home this point:

Childrens Books Infographic 18 24 V3

Now, diversity doesn’t necessarily mean race. It can be gender, sexuality (although this is primarily an issue in literature for older kids), family structure (single parents, two moms, two dads, etc.), disability, and a lot more. It also means showing diversity as incidental. Not all books with African-Americans in them should be about the slave experience. Not all books with Japanese should be about the internment during WWII. Those books are important, and there are a lot of good ones out there, but diversity is all around our kids. Cam is the only fully white kid on our street. There are four other kids who live on our block and they all are all mixed race. Her world doesn’t look like the homogenous world of most children’s books. 

Diversity in publishing also doesn’t have to mean diverse characters. There is a push to publish more diverse authors and to get some diversity into the actual publishing industry. Both of these would make it more likely that diverse characters appear in books without them being flat, stereotypical or tokenistic. 

I really agree with this movement both as an educator and as parent. We are lucky to be white middle class because of the inherent privilege that comes with that and I don’t want Cam to be unaware of that privilege like I was. I want her to see the world as it is instead of defaulting to seeing it as white and I think one way to do that is put books in her hands that reflect the world she lives in and to talk to her about it when they don’t or when the representation is problematic.

I’m making a commitment to be sure that I am supporting diverse books when and where I can and one great place I can do that is here on the blog. I’ll be using this series to review and feature diverse titles that we love (I’ll still share our provocations, but they’ll be in the first week of the month). I’m going to try and have new titles in the column, but I am at the mercy of what is in at the library so I may have to look at some older titles.

I may not buy enough books to make difference and I may not have a loud voice, but I want to use the voice I have to say that #weneeddiversebooks.  

Advent Reflections: 2014/1

Going by the Waldorf celebration of Advent the first week celebrates the mineral kingdom and the festival of stones. To me this indicates a connection with the Earth (nature and seasons fits with the second week that focuses on the plant kingdom).

Being totally original I want to keep our resolution from last year to cut down on waste. I think we have become a lot more conscientious about it this year (especially in regards to food waste), but I would like to look more closely at the things we buy and get rid of to be sure we aren’t creating lots of unnecessary waste that goes into a landfill. I think we’re really good about recycling, but I would like to start looking at things and seeing if they can have a second life as something else. 

Ox Cart ManI have to say one of my favorite children’s books that exemplifies this idea is Ox-Cart Man by Donald Hall and illustrated by Barbara Cooney. A New England farmer takes a cart full of goods to market where he sells everything, even the cart and ox. He brings home a handful of new, useful things to his family who then spends the winter, spring and summer making new things to be taken to market the next fall. The beauty is how they put everything to use on their farm, even things that might not seem like they could be useful. The best example of this is the children collecting the feathers their geese and chickens have dropped to sell as pillow filling. I doubt our family would be that resourceful (although we can aspire!), but I think it’s a good message to look at everything around you and be sure there isn’t something else you can use it for as well as simply being conscious about waste. 

Cool Stuff: Vol. 1, Issue 8

- I came across this interesting piece about the Go the F*ck to Sleep book (and apparently its companion). Like the author of this post, I too found the book a little bit funny the first time through because, as parents, we’ve almost all had those moments. But I agree that the fact that the book became a best seller and warranted another book, belies a disturbing cultural trend that belittles kids and gives people permission to see them as less than people and their wants and desires as unimportant and subordinate to their parents’ wants and desires. 

Here’s a snippet. It’s a short piece I recommend it. 

But the worst thing about this book isn’t how unfunny it is. The worst thing is how mean-spirited it is. Again, the first book, on first read, was worth a cathartic laugh, tapping into the awful things parents sometimes think but dare not say. But doing a second book legitimizes those awful things and says, yes, this deserves a place in our culture’s comic vocabulary. Because it’s fun to swear at kids!

Trigger warning: the f-word is used many times both in the context of the title of the book it is talking about and as a humor device. 

– On a happier note, I was so pleased to read this post on Mummy Musings and Mayhem. Jode talks about how she is waiting the extra year to send her daughters to kindergarten, giving them the gift of time. She articulates everything I feel about it and it is so refreshing and validating to hear another parent say they are more interested in their child’s well-being than pushing academic achievement too early and/or in making themselves look good with their child’s academic achievement (a keeping-up-with-the-Joneses like competition I see parents engaging in with their kids as pawns in that). 

Because of Cam’s late August birthday we are in a school gray area. She is technically old enough to go to Pre-K in the fall of 2015, but she will be very, very young and, I think, immature. At this point we actually haven’t decided what to do. We can do two years of Pre-K, but that would be expensive. We could wait, and that’s a possibility. Or, and this seems the most likely route, we put her in in fall do a year of Pre-K and then pull her out to homeschool at which point her age doesn’t really matter. 

– I know this is posting the day after Thanksgiving, but I think it’s fine to talk about being grateful and thankful during the whole holiday season. Here’s a book suggestion and review of a book that shows what people around the world eat. It really puts things into perspective. If I’m not mistaken there are other books by this author-photographer pair about food. There is also a book by the same photographer that shows people around the world with all their belongings (or most of them) outside their homes with the family surrounding them. That is incredibly eye-opening. Look for these at your public library as they are hefty hardbacks. Good for bringing the holiday season back to Earth a little bit and helping children really see that they have more than enough.

Activity in the Hive: Planning and Documentation Experiment

At the start of October I decided I really needed to come up with a planning process that involved breaking up new provocations and aligning them with a broader plan.

Ever since I read about the Intended Projects document in Working in the Reggio Way (I discuss it a bit here) I have been trying to create my own. This document is an incredibly broad document and defines the overarching themes or concepts you’ll cover in a given period of time. Because it’s such a detailed and long document I really just needed the time to sit down, think through, and then put my thoughts together on paper (so to speak). I recently made the time to do this and to come up with some other pieces of the planning process.

Part of my intention was also to encourage myself to begin documenting Cam’s thinking and learning. This is one of the aspects I really love about the Reggio approach and I think it’s one of the more powerful pieces too because it requires a lot of reflection and listening to the child(ren) on the part of the educator.  

What I have now is essentially a series of documentations that form a beginning, middle, and end. Technically there is no end, but the final document can certainly come at a natural stopping or breaking point and must come after the project has had some time to develop and begin winding down.

My new planning process includes:

  • Intended Projects: This is a document meant to cover the planning for a season or even be a biannual document.  It lays out the broad themes and concepts I want to cover and names and generally plans provocations that will go with those themes.

I identified four core areas I want topics or themes to fall into (Language Arts, Numeracy, Art, and Nature) and then I picked what I wanted the broad topics to be (right now I have Building Letter Awareness as the Language Arts topic). Of course there is tons of overlap and I make note of that. I also have a written statement at the top that addresses both the question “what do I seek to make evident?” and discusses how these topics tie in with Cam’s expressed interests.

There are different types of projects identified within the document too: Umbrella Projects (which are those four core areas), Environmental Projects (these are projects that come out of any of the play areas we have set up in the house), Daily Life Projects (these are projects that come out of her wonderings and musings that happen in the natural course of daily life), and Self-Managed Projects (these I don’t expect to see until Cam is quite a bit older and more independent). Provocations can fall into several types of projects.

Under the general project planning I have a provocation strategies section that contains places to record questions (from me or Cam), materials, scaffolding (any prior knowledge she’ll need or provocations or activities that need to be planned or need to come first), books, and provocations (these are the actual set ups I want to put out). 

I should also note that this is not a static document. I add to it and build on it as I go along. It’s not intended to be perfect or comprehensive the first time around.

  • Provocation (Monthly) Planning: In my Intended Projects I name the provocations I want to set up. In my monthly planning I assigned a week of each month to one of the core areas/umbrella projects. On Mondays I set up the one or two provocations that go along with it (many of the provocations build on each other so there is an order to them). That means each provocation stays out for at least a month and it breaks the set-up process into much more manageable chunks. 
  • Provocation Documentation: This is a final document that will come toward the end of a provocation. It will record a statement about why I did the provocation (what questions Cam had that led there or interest that she showed), notes about context and objectives, materials available, a narrative, what was learned, and follow up ideas. I will also include pictures here. I have yet to finish one of these as we are still in the throes of the our current project How Clothes Are Made. I am hoping this will be a good place to harvest pictures and information to create documentation panels. 

I know all this sounds super formalized and school-y, but it’s all based on what Cam has expressed interest in. I chose Building Letter Awareness because Cam is frequently pointing to scribbles she makes and telling me what word she has written. I think she’s ready to start identifying letters and learning how to turn those scribbles into real letters. I am really interested in keeping a good record of what she is thinking and how she is approaching learning too, so I want to have good documentation of all that. And I am prone to getting lazy about setting things up for her (I’m procrastinating setting up some painting as I type) but if I’m hyper organized and front-load in the planning stage it’s easy for me to follow through. I guess you could say this (should) keep me honest. 

So, that’s what I’ve been up to lately. Keep in mind that I am crazy organized and a total neat freak (always have been) so this may be way beyond what any normal parent wants to do. Any one else do planning like this? How do you approach planning?