Tag Archives: Loose Parts

Last Week on the Light Table: 3

2015-09-15 09.34.36 I’m slowly letting the light table take over a small area in our living room. I now have out several baskets and trays that allow many of our materials to stay out longer than a week or a few days.

Last week we had: 

I added some slotted translucent builders. This is a similar set on Amazon.

2015-09-15 09.34.42We also have straws and play dough out for building. As a side note, those Play-Doh containers are damn hard to open. I wish I knew of a better way to store it so it doesn’t dry out, but Cam could get into it by herself. 

Update: Cut the straws in half. Long straws are floppy and slippery and were really hard to build with. Narrower ones might be better too. 

Last Week on the Light Table: 2

The light table has remained really popular. Cam uses it at least once a day, which has really surprised me. She especially liked the stencils so I have left them out. I also added a couple new activities and put Blokus away. 

Last week we had:

2015-09-10 07.20.12Stained Glass Coloring Sheets and loose parts: Dover makes these coloring sheets that are meant to go in your window once they are colored. I bought a small kaleidoscope patterned booklet and an Arabic patterns which has a lot of geometric patterns. I paired them with tiles, jewels, and translucent beads. 

2015-09-10 07.19.16Transparency sheets and overhead markers: A few years ago the school my husband and I work for switched to digital overhead projectors and other technologies. They ditched all the overhead projectors and a lot of transparency sheets and markers. At the end of the year we rescued a bunch from going into the dumpster. I put out markers and cut down the sheets into smaller squares/rectangles. I also drew patterns on two sheets and set them on the light table with some glass jewels. 

For Your Bookshelf: Loose Parts by Lisa Daly & Miriam Beloglovsky

Loose PartsLoose Parts: Inspiring Play in Young Children by Lisa Daly and Miriam Beloglovsky, photographs by Jenna Daly

From GoodReads: Loose parts are natural or synthetic found, bought, or upcycled materials that children can move, manipulate, control, and change within their play. Alluring and captivating, they capture children’s curiosity, give free reign to their imagination, and motivate learning.

The hundreds of inspiring photographs showcase an array of loose parts in real early childhood settings. And the overviews of concepts children can learn when using loose parts provide the foundation for incorporating loose parts into your teaching to enhance play and empower children. The possibilities are truly endless.

I came across this book through a couple of Australian blogs that I follow. I had recently read Beautiful Stuff and wanted to learn more about how to employ the loose parts theory. I was surprised to find, once I got a copy of the book, that it was written by two professors here in Sacramento. They used the child care center out at the community college in Fairfield. Small world. 

The book was incredibly inspiring and had tons and tons of high quality pictures. The text is short, but deals with the theory of loose parts and then discusses different areas that are developed by using them, i.e. sound, creativity, and action. It’s easy to read and understand and doesn’t have a lot of jargon or overly academic language. I know right now I appreciate that in a book. I just don’t have the mental capacity to read something dry and technical at the end of the day.  

I did keep going back and forth wishing there was a bit more writing and discussing of the theory of loose parts and simply appreciating that there wasn’t much direction. I think I was hoping the pictures would be more like a documentation panel. I struggle getting Cam to engage with the materials. They can sit out for months and she won’t touch them. Then one day she’ll pick them up and find something to do with them or I’ll need to direct her. And I don’t want to direct her, I want it to come from her. On the other hand, having too rigid a set of documentation might not have helped me find good materials and set ups. Part of the point of loose parts is that they can be used in open ended ways and should be tailored to the interests of the child and to the environment. And often the pictures spoke for themselves. 

All in all, this is a worthwhile book both for the information on loose parts and why you should use them and for the pictures that will give you unlimited inspiration for materials to try out and how to set them up in provocative ways. My copy is riddled with sticky notes directing me to provocations and to loose parts I want to set out. I think a second reading of the book is in order to review the theory behind the materials.